Talk:SPITBOL

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Just a note to say that I wrote the original... I wasn't logged in then. -- Rochkind

There was already a stub article at SPITBOL. However I have made a redirect to this one which is better. I have also removed it from VfD since it should never have been there in the first place. Also note that you should sign your talk to avoid confusion with following comments. You can do this by typing in three or four ~ characters in a group. I have taken the liberty of signing your comment for you this time. -- Derek Ross 18:49, 5 Dec 2003 (UTC)

GNAT, the Ada compiler in GCC, has a string manipulation package which is called Spitbol. As I understand it, it's sort of like a generalized regular expression package which uses Spitbol (or would that be Snobol?) syntax. 213.184.192.82 11:11, 9 November 2006 (UTC)


This is not really a different language, right? It should probably be categorized under Category:Computer programming tools or maybe a compiler subcat. Stan 02:21, 23 Aug 2004 (UTC)

wtf[edit]

SNOBOL4 programs run under SPITBOL are amazingly fast.

This article is amazingly bad. --142.177.99.202 (talk) 01:29, 25 July 2009 (UTC)

Yep, it reads as if written by an naive beginner programmer. It's neither measured nor neutral. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 82.9.176.129 (talk) 15:33, 15 April 2014 (UTC)

Implementations[edit]

Where to find various implementations would be useful info. E.g., I'd like a Windows10 executable, if there is such a thing. I suspect that there isn't, but it would be nice to know for sure just what there was and where to find it. 31.52.253.69 (talk) 13:30, 6 April 2019 (UTC)